Exotic animals by Karley Feaver

Karley Feaver was born in 1978, New Plymouth and studied at Wellington School of Design (Industrial Design) and at Unitec (3D design). She is dedicated to creating exotic animals mixing several features of different species.

In April 2015 Karley exhibited works at Dudok in Arnhem, in conjunction with the Arnhem Museum for the Beauty of the Beast exhibition, and a group exhibition curated by Nancy Gifford titled Flock, in California. In 2013 Karley was invited as a guest artist for Remake: Emerging Artists at The Academy of Fine Arts in Wellington. Also in 2013, she was invited to exhibit at solo show at Saatchi & Saatchi gallery in Auckland. And in 2011 Karley was one of 14 artists chosen to exhibit at the United States Ambassador’s Residence in Wellington, as part of the Art in Embassies Program curated by Nathan Huff and James Brown.

Karley Feaver was born in 1978, New Plymouth and studied at Wellington School of Design. She is dedicated to creating exotic animals mixing animal features.

Karley Feaver was born in 1978, New Plymouth and studied at Wellington School of Design. She is dedicated to creating exotic animals mixing animal features.

Karley Feaver was born in 1978, New Plymouth and studied at Wellington School of Design. She is dedicated to creating exotic animals mixing animal features.

Karley Feaver was born in 1978, New Plymouth and studied at Wellington School of Design. She is dedicated to creating exotic animals mixing animal features.

Karley’s works transports you into a world of exotic creatures filled with odd familiarities and strangeness. She works across a range of disciplines including painting, sculpture and taxidermy.

Karley’s works are held in the James Wallace Arts Trust collection, Westpac New Zealand’s corporate collection and in private collections in the UK, USA, Australia, Russia, Switzerland and New Zealand.

The animals Karley uses are ethically sourced and have died of natural causes. None are harmed for the sake of creating art.

Transforming found birds from stagnant figures to sculptural objects, the reconfigured animals are fitted with extravagant hairdos. Ponytails, mohawks, dreadlocks, and braids are styled onto the colorful fowl, some with shining gold-painted beaks, granting each a personality, identity, and singular charm.  Habitats fashioned from both human and synthetic hair weave new interpretations of traditional nestings, modeling a novel type of avian architecture.

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ART ISSUE 2021 - IMPACTFUL MINDS