Forgotten series by Shan Hur

Shan Hur might best be described as an architectural interventionist. He touches the walls of the buildings to bring them a mysterious life in the Forgotten series.

Through his subtle objects and installations, he transforms ordinary spaces—including galleries, disused offices, and building facades—into construction sites, revealing the beauty in the mundane and unexpected, and upending conventional notions of what constitutes a work of art.

Shan Hur might best be described as an architectural interventionist. She touches the walls of the buildings to create the Forgotten series.

Shan Hur might best be described as an architectural interventionist. She touches the walls of the buildings to create the Forgotten series.

Shan Hur might best be described as an architectural interventionist. She touches the walls of the buildings to create the Forgotten series.

Shan Hur might best be described as an architectural interventionist. She touches the walls of the buildings to create the Forgotten series.

He is inspired by shuttered shops and construction sites, locations poised between openness and solidity, where the guts of our otherwise veneered urban environments are temporarily exposed. His interventions have included gauging holes into columns and scratching crevices into walls, into which he inserts such curiosities as stoneware or coins. “I feel that my art doesn’t truly exist until people fully discover it,” Hur has stated, and indeed, to see his art, viewers must first recognize it.

Artist statement: “Closed shops or construction sites are vague and attractive because the space used to be different – it is being changed into something new.
Walking through the debris I have feelings that are neither positive or negative because certain things have already happened and are progressing in a certain direction. Such scenes interest me as they temporarily sidestep into silence and incompleteness. I like the way something is revealed in this gap.

Sculptures bigger than human scale seem to be exaggerated. One of the issues I have focussed on is how to reduce the burden of the volume of sculpture. I then connect this mass to it’s surroundings, but not just as a part of the whole. I think sculpture should communicate with it’s circumstances.”

See also Contemporary art: Emil Alzamora HERE!

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ART ISSUE 2021 - IMPACTFUL MINDS