Michael Walker’s Awesome Art Knives

Ex- Jewelry maker Michael Walker started dedicating to create Awesome Art Knives after his wife gave him a magazine for knife collectors.

In his 20’s, Michael Walker worked as a jewelry maker. But after this gift, Walker looked through the pages and figured he’d give knife making a try.

Ex- Jewelry maker Michael Walker is now dedicated to create Awesome Art Knives after his wife gave him a magazine for knife collectors.

Ex- Jewelry maker Michael Walker is now dedicated to create Awesome Art Knives after his wife gave him a magazine for knife collectors.

Ex- Jewelry maker Michael Walker is now dedicated to create Awesome Art Knives after his wife gave him a magazine for knife collectors.

Ex- Jewelry maker Michael Walker is now dedicated to create Awesome Art Knives after his wife gave him a magazine for knife collectors.

That was way back in 1975, and by 1980 he was making knives full-time. His highly-sought-after creations sell for as much as five figures. And they’re not just pretty: Walker holds some 20 patents and trademarks for folding knife mechanisms, starting with the “Linerlock” mechanism for folding knives.

Interestingly enough, Walker started out making fixed-knife blades, but after filling an early order for ten knives, the buyer asked him to make leather sheathes to hold them. Walker did it, but disliked making sheathes so much that he switched over to folding knives, which don’t require them. Thus began his mechanical innovation.

Ex- Jewelry maker Michael Walker is now dedicated to create Awesome Art Knives after his wife gave him a magazine for knife collectors.

Michael Walker's Awesome Art Knives- fine art6

Michael Walker's Awesome Art Knives- fine art7

Mike noted that only a thin extension of the liner could be used as the lock in the standard design. This was because most of the liner had to engage the pivot pin, in order to hold the knife together against the tension of the backspring. The result is that this type of lock is inherently weak.

The artist realized that if spring tension and lock-up could be provided by a liner alone, he would be able to dispense with the backspring entirely. With the back spring gone, he could then have the end of the liner cut-out engage the bottom end of the tang, making for a much stronger and more positive lock.

Walker’s Linerlock design turned out to be four times stronger, in destruction tests, than the standard locking mechanism. And he’s set the geometry up in such a way that the mechanism is essentially self-adjusting for wear, preventing the blade from loosening up over time.

Meet also Maarten Baas cutlery for Valerie Objects HERE!

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