Painted wooden branches by Alison Moritsugu

Alison Moritsugu was born and raised in Hawai‘i and left the islands after high school to dedicate herself to painted wooden branches.

When European settlers arrived throughout the 18th and 19th centuries and rapidly expanded their territory across North America, the prevalent belief was that of Manifest Destiny. Specifically, that American settlers were destined to expand throughout the continent by any means necessary regardless of cost, environmental impact, or the devastating harm to Native American populations. The artwork of the period, primarily sweeping landscapes influenced by the European pastoral tradition, did well to capture the pristine beauty of the previously undocumented continent, but completely glossed over the reality of what was really happening.

Alison Moritsugu was born and raised in Hawai‘i and left the islands after high school to dedicate herself to painted wooden branches.

Alison Moritsugu was born and raised in Hawai‘i and left the islands after high school to dedicate herself to painted wooden branches.

Alison Moritsugu was born and raised in Hawai‘i and left the islands after high school to dedicate herself to painted wooden branches.

Alison Moritsugu was born and raised in Hawai‘i and left the islands after high school to dedicate herself to painted wooden branches.

Alison Moritsugu was born and raised in Hawai‘i and left the islands after high school to dedicate herself to painted wooden branches.

Alison Moritsugu was born and raised in Hawai‘i and left the islands after high school to dedicate herself to painted wooden branches.

In her log paintings, artist Alison Moritsugu faces that strange juxtaposition head-on by choosing a literal meataphor—the remains of downed trees—as a canvas for her bucolic oil paintings of the countryside where that very tree may have once originated. A fantastic collision of art history and environmental awareness. The rough edges of the cut branches and trunks appear like windows into the past, telling a story that the tree’s rings alone cannot.

It should be noted that Moritsugu uses salvaged log segments from naturally fallen trees, or trees that would otherwise be turned into mulch.

She received a BFA from Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri and an MFA from the School of Visual Arts in New York. She lives and works in Beacon, NY. Moritsugu’s work has been exhibited in solo shows at many International museums, galleries and exhibitions.

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ART ISSUE 2021 - IMPACTFUL MINDS